Archive

Tag Archives: París

Art historians like to make groups. They like to put artists into categories, into different boxes, and stick labels on them. This is all understandable – a lack of descriptive tags and names would make it much harder to describe an artist’s style. But it is not always immediately obvious which of these group names were slapped on by art historians and journalists, and which were declared by the artists themselves.

Paul Sérusier, The Talisman, the Aven River at the Bois d'Amour, October 1888. Oil on wood, 27 x 21 cm. Musée d’Orsay, Paris.

Paul Sérusier, The Talisman, the Aven River at the Bois d’Amour, October 1888.
Oil on wood, 27 x 21 cm. Musée d’Orsay, Paris.

‘Impressionist’ was originally used as a derogatory term by scathing critics, the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood were self-named, the Neo-Impressionists were also christened by a journalist, but a friendly supporter this time, and as for so-called ‘Post-Impressionism’… well, that wasn’t coined until after many of the artists it applied to were dead, and is considered by many as meaningless and inaccurate. The Nabis, however, were one of the tightest-knit and most clearly-defined artistic groups. They banded together in 1892 at the Académie Julian, flocking around Paul Sérusier upon his return from Brittany bearing wisdom imparted from Gauguin and The Talisman, which he painted under Gauguin’s guidance. The members were soon giving each other nicknames, meeting in Paul Ranson’s studio (known as ‘The Temple’), and sending each other letters in a secret language.

Félix Vallotton, Portrait of Édouard Vuillard, 1893. Oil on panel, 30 x 25 cm. Private collection.

Félix Vallotton, Portrait of Édouard Vuillard, 1893.
Oil on panel, 30 x 25 cm.
Private collection.

Though devoted to their group throughout the 1890s, by the turn of the new century these artists had gone their separate ways. This might not surprise you, taking a quick look at their works; although there are certainly stylistic similarities, you might not immediately group these artists together. The things that united them (devotion to Synthetism, interest in the theatre and in decorative art, desire to move away from both Impressionism and academic training) also left room for a wide variation in media, religiousness, and style.

Left: Pierre Bonnard, La Revue Blanche, 1894. Colour lithographic poster, 80 x 62 cm. National Gallery of Australia, Canberra Source: http://nga.gov.au/ Right : Paul Ranson, Lustral, 1891. Tempera on canvas, 35.5 x 24.3 cm. Musée d’Orsay, Paris. Edouard Vuillard, The Earthenware Pot, 1895. Oil on canvas, 65 x 116 cm. On loan from a private collection, National Gallery, London.

Left: Pierre Bonnard, La Revue Blanche, 1894. Colour lithographic poster, 80 x 62 cm.
National Gallery of Australia, Canberra
Source: http://nga.gov.au/
Right : Paul Ranson, Lustral, 1891. Tempera on canvas, 35.5 x 24.3 cm. Musée d’Orsay, Paris.
Edouard Vuillard, The Earthenware Pot,
1895.
Oil on canvas, 65 x 116 cm.
On loan from a private collection, National Gallery, London.

The influence of Japanese prints upon their work, seen in the prominence of large areas of flat colour, pattern, and a strong focus on the decorative is another clear feature of the Nabis’ art. And yet the next Nabi work you chance upon may show none of these characteristics. Does it seem, for you, that these ‘Nabis’ were really united through a particular style, or were they perhaps simply a group of artist friends drawn together more by their sense of fraternity and love of secretive group behavior? Decide for yourselves by picking up a copy of Nathalia Brodskaia’s Félix Vallotton, or Albert Kostenevitch’s The Nabis. For a closer look at Vallotton’s work, head along to Amsterdam’s Van Gogh Museum from 14 February until 1 June 2014 to visit their exhibition dedicated to the artist.

G.A.

www.felix-vallotton.com/

Félix Vallottons Beziehung zum Ersten Weltkrieg kann sicherlich als speziell charakterisiert werden. Seine Kunst allerdings liefert eine interessante Darstellung der verschiedenen Realitäten des Krieges.

Senegalesische Soldaten im Lager von Mailly, 1917. Öl auf Leinwand, 46 x 55 cm. Musée Départemental de l'Oise, Beauvais.

Senegalesische Soldaten im Lager von Mailly, 1917. Öl auf Leinwand, 46 x 55 cm. Musée Départemental de l’Oise, Beauvais.

In dem Gemälde sieht man eine Gruppe schwarzer Soldaten. Die Gruppe an sich und auch die einzelnen Männer innerhalb der Gruppe wirken isoliert. Die mithilfe des Schnees dargestellte inhaltliche Kälte wird durch die kühle Distanziertheit in Vallottons Malstil verstärkt. Die aus dem Senegal stammenden Soldaten müssen in einem Krieg dienen, der nicht ihrer ist, und für eine Kolonialmacht kämpfen, die Soldaten aus den eigenen Kolonien als Kanonenfutter einsetzt. Das Warten auf den nächsten Einsatz wird so zum Alptraum in einer fremden, feindlichen Umgebung.

Der Holzschnitt zeigt im Gegensatz dazu die ganze Grausamkeit des Kriegseinsatzes. In der für seine Drucke typischen comic-haften Weise zeigt Vallotton zwei zwischen den Fronten im Stacheldraht gefangene Soldaten, die von selbst kaum noch eine Chance auf Überleben haben. Hilfe scheint nicht in Sicht. Das Motiv des Schnees wiederholt sich auch hier, erhält allerdings noch einmal eine Steigerung: Es ist Nacht. Man fragt sich, wie lange die beiden sich dort schon ihrem Schicksal ergeben müssen. Sind sie bereits tot?

Stacheldraht (Les Fils de Fer) aus der Reihe Das ist der Krieg (C'est la Guerre), 1916. Holzschnitt, 17,5 x 22,3 cm. The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Stacheldraht (Les Fils de Fer) aus der Reihe Das ist der Krieg (C’est la Guerre), 1916. Holzschnitt, 17,5 x 22,3 cm. The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Mit diesen beiden Bildern gelingt es Vallotton, die unterschiedlichen Realitäten des Krieges einzufangen. Die eisige Leere ist in beiden Werken mit den Händen zu greifen und der kühle, realistische Chrakter seiner Arbeiten schildert eine Wahrheit, die dem Betrachter in ihrer Klarheit und Einfachheit brutal entgegenschlägt: Im Krieg kämpft jeder für sich.

Die Ausstellung Félix Vallotton: Feuer unter Eis im Grand Palais in Paris vom 30. September 2013 bis zum 20. Januar 2014 bietet die einmalige Gelegenheit, diesen außergewöhnlichen Künstler und seine ausdrucksstarken Bilder kennenzulernen.

Passend dazu können Sie das Werk Vallottons in Natalia Brodskaïas Buch Vallotton des Verlags Parkstone-International entdecken.

www.felix-vallotton.com/

Aunque es un pintor con un estilo muy reconocible, seguramente lo que más fama le ha dado a Félix Vallotton son sus xilografías. El pintor nacido en Lausana fue miembro del grupo Nabi formado en torno a Maurice Denis, Serusier, Bonnard, Vuillard y otros jóvenes pintores vanguardistas, pero la suya fue siempre una participación algo “periférica”. Lo mismo se puede decir de las demás corrientes a las que se le ha adscrito porque Vallotton, como todods los grandes artistas, es esquivo a las etiquetas contundentes.

Los temas de sus grabados son los mismos de su pintura: tanto las escenas callejeras como los interiores merecen su atención, y en muchas ocasiones ello se adereza con sentido del humor o la presencia implícita de algo que se nos escapa. Como en sus mejores cuadros -piénsese en La visita– Vallotton es un pintor sutil que no revela nada de inmediato. Un primer vistazo de sus cuadros nos dirá muy poco acerca de lo verdaderamente importante, esto es, lo que late bajo la superficie. Por eso resulta muy acertado el título de la exposición que se le está dedicando en el Grand Palais de París, “El fuego bajo el hielo”.

La visita, 1899

Read More

“Everything thunders and smells of battle,” declared Félix Vallotton in July, 1914. War was engulfing Europe and even artists, so often pictured as absent-minded beings, isolated in their studios, were inevitably embroiled along with the rest of society. Vallotton felt compelled to contribute to the war effort but, at nearly 50 years of age, was dismissed as too old for army enrolment. So instead he turned to reflecting the war through his art. Or at least, he attempted to.

Félix Vallotton, The Anarchist, 1892.  Woodcut.  Private collection.

Félix Vallotton, The Anarchist, 1892. Woodcut. Private collection.

Growing up in the Jura region of Switzerland and then moving to late-19th century Paris, Vallotton had experienced his share of radical political environments. Read More

Felix Vallotton tried his hand in many art forms, ranging from landscapes to woodcuts to printmaking. While he is probably most celebrated for his nudes, his woodcuts speak more to his talent as an artist.

In his paintings, his palette choice, technique, and subjects (usually naked women) manage to capture the attention on any onlooker. But his woodcuts contain a richer and more mysterious meaning.

The woodcut entitled Money (below) presents a scene between a man shrouded in darkness and a woman, whose white dress lends her an air of innocence. While at first I considered the man to be a predator and the woman to be a helpless victim of his advances, the title eventually convinced me that the woman probably plays a greater role than she first suggests. Rather an innocent, damsel in distress, could she instead be money-hungry prostitute luring her next client through cold demeanour?

Felix Vallotton, Money, 1898 Woodcut

Felix Vallotton, Money, 1898
Woodcut

That is the beauty of Vallotton’s woodcuts. Read More

Die Jahrhundertwende vom 19. zum 20. Jahrhundert war in jeder Hinsicht eine Zeitenwende, die im Spannungsfeld der beiden Pole der etablierten Traditionen einerseits und der immer schneller voranschreitenden Moderne andererseits gesehen werden muss. In allen Bereichen öffneten sich bisher ungekannte Möglichkeiten mit teils enormen Auswirkungen auf die gesamte Gesellschaft.

Diese Veränderungen wirkten sich auch auf die Kunst aus.Gegen Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts tat sich schließlich eine Gruppe von Künstlern zusammen, die sich selbst als Propheten bezeichnete. Innerhalb dieser Gruppe, die unter anderem Künstler wie Paul Ranson und Paul Sérusier versammelte, findet sich auch der gebürtige Schweizer Félix Édouard Vallotton, auch der Fremde Nabi genannt.

Félix Vallotton: Frau mit Dienstmagd beim Baden, 1896. Öl auf Karton, 52 x 66 cm. Privatsammlung.

Félix Vallotton: Frau mit Dienstmagd beim Baden, 1896. Öl auf Karton, 52 x 66 cm. Privatsammlung.

Doch welche Botschaft hatten diese Künstler? Read More

Cyniques, drôles, critiques acerbes ou parfois poétiques… Les gravures de Félix Vallotton s’éloignent définitivement de l’image un peu barbante que vous pouviez vous faire de l’art de la gravure.

Vous pouvez me croire, elles sont vraiment drôles ! Comme cette snob qui tente de garder toute sa dignité malgré un gros coup de vent :

Le /coup de Vent, 1894. Xylographie.

Le Coup de Vent, 1894.
Xylographie.

Ses gravures qui dépeignent en toute simplicité la vie quotidienne parisienne, permettront à Vallotton de se faire un nom. Non seulement en France, mais partout dans le monde.

On comprend pourquoi en observant La Paresse ; ici Vallotton a su capter un instant que je trouve magique. En choisissant cette scène anodine, l’artiste en fait un sujet a part entière qui nous parle à tous. Read More

Sex sells. Or at least in today’s society, the marketing world strategically incorporates erotic imagery in advertisements to gain consumers’ attention. If the moniker “sex sells” is true for advertisements, could it also be true in art? In nude paintings, does the artist aim to “sell” something by enticing us with the image of a naked and supple body?

When looking through Felix Vallotton’s artistic catalog, the amount of nudity is great. Vallotton used naked women in any context, from nude women bathing to nude women playing with kittens.

Félix Vallotton, Nude Women with Cats, c. 1897-1898. Oil on cardboard, 41 x 52 cm. Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne

Félix Vallotton, Nude Women with Cats, c. 1897-1898.
Oil on cardboard, 41 x 52 cm.
Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne

Vallotton, like most artists, appreciated beauty, including the beauty of the naked human body. But while the artist might have seen the beauty of the female form, what exactly does the observer experience when confronted with subtle eroticism? Read More